Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Diversity and Conservation of Waterbirds in the Northern Avifaunal Region of Sri Lanka

Download

A- A+
dyslexia friendly

Research Articles

Diversity and Conservation of Waterbirds in the Northern Avifaunal Region of Sri Lanka

Authors:

Chaminda S. Wijesundara ,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About Chaminda S.
Department of Zoology
X close

Deepal Warakagoda,

Ceylon Bird Club, 127, Nawala Road, Colombo 5, LK
X close

Udaya Sirivardana,

Ceylon Bird Club, 127, Nawala Road, Colombo 5, LK
X close

Dilan Chathuranga,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya Department of Zoology, LK
X close

Tharangi Hettiarachchi,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About Tharangi
Department of Zoology
X close

Nuwanthika Perera,

Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas, US
About Nuwanthika
Department of Biological Sciences
X close

Packiyanathan Rajkumar,

Divisional Secretariat, Chundukkuli, Jaffna, LK
About Packiyanathan
Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya
X close

Saumya Wanniarachchi,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About Saumya
Department of Zoology
X close

Gayani Weerakoon

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About Gayani
Department of Zoology
X close

Abstract

The aim of the present study is to evaluate the waterbird diversity, distribution, and conservation status in the northern avifaunal region of Sri Lanka, which includes two of the four richest waterbird regions in Sri Lanka, namely Jaffna and Mannar. We compiled data from the annual waterbird censuses and monthly records of the Ceylon Bird Club from 2011 to 2017 and from a systematic survey carried out by us from October 2014 to March 2016.

 

We recorded a total of 116 species of waterbirds belonging to 23 families. Among them are species confined to the northern region including the rare breeding residents the Crab Plover (Dromas ardeola), Indian Courser (Cursorius coromandelicus), Spot-billed Duck (Anas poecilorhyncha), and Saunders’s Tern (Sternula saundersi). The Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus), which is now uncommon elsewhere in Sri Lanka, was recorded in high numbers. The Spot-billed Duck, which was a very rare migrant to Sri Lanka until recently, was found to have established breeding populations in the region. The Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) and Comb Duck (Sarkidiornis melanotos), which are extirpated breeding residents in Sri Lanka, were recorded as part of the migrant population. The Common Coot (Fulica atra), which was previously considered a very rare breeding resident, was found to be abundant with over 1,000 individuals in some localities.
How to Cite: Wijesundara, C. S., Warakagoda, D., Sirivardana, U., Chathuranga, D., Hettiarachchi, T., Perera, N., … Weerakoon, G. (2017). Diversity and Conservation of Waterbirds in the Northern Avifaunal Region of Sri Lanka. Ceylon Journal of Science, 46(5), 143–155. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/cjs.v46i5.7462
Published on 23 Nov 2017.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)

    comments powered by Disqus